Wild Pigment Project (@wildpigmentproject)

4 days ago

i’ve often heard it said, or seen it written: ‘natural pigments are nice an’ all, but there are no good, lasting greens to speak of!’ i confess, i thought it myself when i first considered getting rid of my synthetic paints. ‘what about the greens! i can’t possibly survive on dull mud-greens when all i long for is electric chartreuse, emerald and kelly green…!’ so when i did decide to open the door to the mystery of wild paints, the first thing i wanted to find out was: could i build a palette of satisfying greens? here are some of the friends i’ve encountered on my path. some are celadonites — or perhaps, glauconites — i’m not sure which, since i haven’t had them lab-analyzied. they’re from oregon, and also some from utah. plus a few flakes of green asper, also from oregon, which i find too hard to grind, but beautiful to behold. and, a lovely couple of blue-green chlorite stones given to me by @pigmenthunter . oh, and iris green! the deep teal blotch from this year, and last year’s painted strip of birch bark, its green perfectly preserved (i kept it in a dark drawer ). the dance i’ve done with these greens, so that i really feel their greens, has been about who they’re next to (like pink ochres! or madder reds ) and also, who they’re layered with. tricky to sum up tidily, but i want to share some of my delight in green with you here. i’ll be doing a lil’ series — an ode to late spring, or early summer and its explosions of greens… to the green fuse that drives the flower… #green #greens #nofilter #springgreen #naturalpigments #wildpigments #paletteremediation #glauconite #celadonite #chlorite #foraging #makepaint #reciprocity #leaves #trees #grass #fields #greenflowers #stoneflowers #earlysummer #thankyoudylan

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